Artwork and Design Requirements

To meet Chase Street A&E’s quality standards, decoration requires vector or high-resolution raster artwork. If you have a low-resolution image that’s inspired an idea, we also offer creative services to convert the image to a high-quality format. 

To avoid additional charges for decoration requiring engraving or embroidery, we request vector artwork. For full-color printing, we request artwork that will be 200 DPI or higher when printed. Please note that a screenshot of an image on your phone will not be high-resolution enough to avoid creative fees.

What is vector artwork?

Vector graphics (with extensions such as .eps, .svg, .pdf, .ai, .cdr) are images  defined by mathematical lines and curves instead of dots on a grid. The advantage of vector graphics over raster graphics is that they can be resized to any size without reduced quality. Vector images also allow us to more easily change your artwork into single-color files suitable for laser engraving. The below image illustrates what happens when a vector image is resized compared to a bitmap:

What does DPI mean?

Bitmap or raster graphics (with extensions such as .bmp, .jpg, .png, .gif) refers to a rectangular grid of pixels (points of color). When you enlarge a raster image, the individual pixels will become visible and give a blocky jagged appearance unless the image is high-resolution. DPI (dots per inch) refers to the number of pixels in each inch of printed material. 

For example, a 1000x1000 pixel .jpeg file will be 5 square inches when printed at 200 DPI (1000 pixels ➗ 200 dpi = 5 inches). If you want something to print at 8x10 inches, the resolution needs to be 1600x2000 pixels (8 inches x 200 dpi = 1600 pixels, 10 inches x 200 dpi = 2000 pixels).

Examples: